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Posts tagged "Immigration Law"

Take the election into account in your answers to the civics test

If you are preparing for the naturalization test, you should keep in mind that some of the answers changed after the last election. You will be asked to name certain officials and elected representatives. You don't want to make a mistake and name an official who is no longer in office.

Trump administration changes age for special immigrant juveniles

Special immigrant juvenile status is granted to unmarried immigrants under the age of 21 who are already in the U.S. and have an American juvenile court order taking them into the custody of a state agency or department.

USCIS now offers online submission for some immigration law forms

Wanting to live in California or other parts of the United States as a citizen can be difficult for people who have moved to the U.S. from other countries. Immigration law changes rapidly, and it is not unusual for individuals to face many hurdles as they work through the naturalization process. Some changes to the ways in which immigrants can apply for citizenship may help them complete steps more quickly.

Federal court: People can seek asylum for gang, domestic violence

In June 2018, the Trump administration announced a new "expedited removal" policy which denied people the right to seek asylum based on domestic or gang violence. Now, a federal judge has struck down that policy as being in violation of the Immigration and Naturalization Act, the Administrative Procedure Act and the Refugee Act. He also found that there was no legal basis "for an effective categorical ban on domestic violence and gang-related claims."

Diversity lottery winners, others challenge effect of travel ban

Two groups of immigrants are involved in lawsuits challenging the application of President Trump's travel ban. A group of Yemenis and Iranians who won the U.S. diversity lottery but were nevertheless barred from entering the country are suing in Washington, D.C. Here in San Francisco, a group of 36 plaintiffs argues that the waiver process in the travel ban is a sham.

Change in immigration norms drives more citizenship applications

Billy Idol recently became a citizen of the United States. The 63-year-old rock star, originally from England, was sworn in at a Los Angeles ceremony in November. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services tweeted, "it's a nice day for a naturalization ceremony."

How does asylum work in the United States?

With thousands of men, women and children headed toward our Southern border, many will be seeking asylum in the United States. This is an entirely legal process, and the U.S. pledged in the 1951 UN Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees to accept eligible asylum seekers and a share of qualifying refugees. That treaty, commonly called the 1951 Refugee Convention, also prohibits the U.S. from returning refugees and asylum seekers to the countries they fled from.

DHS issues final rule on what aid counts as a 'public charge'

Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced a proposal that would have impacted many immigrants seeking admission to the U.S., wishing to extend a nonimmigrant stay or applying for green cards. Immigrants engaging in those immigration activities are required to prove that they won't be an economic burden on American society -- a "public charge," as the law terms it. The DHS proposal sought to clarify which public benefits could count against immigrants trying to prove they won't be a public charge.

Federal court: Grants can't be withheld from sanctuary cities

The Trump administration's plan to withhold criminal justice grants from sanctuary jurisdictions has now been permanently blocked. Federal judges in Chicago, Philadelphia and now San Francisco have ruled that the Justice Department cannot place immigration-related conditions on the grants. Moreover, they struck down as unconstitutional a longstanding immigration law, Section 1373 of Title * of the U.S. Code, that appeared to support the administration's position.

DHS: Accepting public benefits will now weigh against immigrants

If you’re applying for a green card, you probably already know that you have to prove you won’t be an economic burden -- a “public charge” on American society. Recently, however, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced a new proposal that could make it harder for some immigrants to prove that.

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