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Family Immigration Archives

I'm now a US citizen. Can I bring my loved ones to live here?

Congratulations on becoming a naturalized citizen. One of the privileges of citizenship is the ability to bring your immediate relatives here to become lawful permanent residents, and possibly future citizens. Immediate relatives include any unmarried children you have who are under 21, your parents (if you are 21 or older) and your spouse. You can also sponsor your married children and, if you are 21 or older, your siblings.

Removing conditional status on your marriage-based green card

If you had been married for less than two years when you were granted permanent residence (a green card), your status is conditional. The reason is that you are required to prove your marriage was legitimate and not a so-called "green card marriage" meant to thwart U.S. immigration law.

Validating a marriage to a citizen? Beware of old deportation orders

While previous administrations focused on deporting only those immigrants who commit serious crimes, the Trump administration has made clear that anyone in the United States without proper authorization is fair game for deportation. Furthermore, immigration agents will arrest unauthorized immigrants wherever it finds them.

I'm now a citizen. What happens to the family petition I filed?

You were a lawful permanent resident, but now you are a U.S. citizen. While you were a lawful permanent resident, did you file a petition to bring your spouse or children to the U.S.? If so, you may have been told that your petition was "family second preference." Family preference visas for lawful permanent residents are limited in number. If there are no more visas when the limit is reached, your family members will have to wait.

The first step in family immigration: Getting an immigrant visa

If you are a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (green card holder), you may want to sponsor a relative to live in the United States. Both citizens and permanent residents can do so, although the rules are somewhat different. The first step, however, is sponsoring your relative for an immigrant visa. An immigrant visa is the type that can ultimately result in lawful permanent residence.

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