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August 2018 Archives

Business Roundtable decries arbitrary, inconsistent H-1B processing

Dozens of U.S. business leaders, including CEOs at top American companies, recently signed a joint letter to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen. They expressed "serious concern" over several Trump administration immigration policies, focusing on those surrounding H-1B visas. The signatories of the joint letter included the heads of Apple, IBM, Salesforce, BlackRock, PepsiCo, JPMorgan Chase and others.

I want to work in the US. What visa options are available?

If you would like to come to the United States for work, you need an employment-based visa. There are two classifications of employment-based visas: temporary and permanent. Each type has many visas to choose from, but you may only qualify for specific ones.

Administration weighs reducing refugee admissions again

Even though the number of refugees being admitted to the United States has reached an historic low, the Trump administration is considering reducing that number even further. The U.S. refugee program is meant to offer a chance at stability for people forced out of their homes by disasters or unrest.

9th Circuit: Separation of powers protects sanctuary city grants

A federal appeals court has just struck down the Trump administration's plan to punish so-called "sanctuary" jurisdictions by refusing to issue approved criminal justice grants. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled that separation of powers and the constitution's Spending Clause vest spending decisions exclusively with Congress.

Could your U.S. citizenship be at risk from Operation Janus?

When Davinder S. came to America, he arrived without any travel documents or proof of identity. He petitioned for asylum under a different first name, Baljinder, but he abandoned that petition. Eventually, he married a U.S. citizen and became a lawful permanent resident. Years later, he became a U.S. citizen -- again under the name Baljinder.

I'm now a US citizen. Can I bring my loved ones to live here?

Congratulations on becoming a naturalized citizen. One of the privileges of citizenship is the ability to bring your immediate relatives here to become lawful permanent residents, and possibly future citizens. Immediate relatives include any unmarried children you have who are under 21, your parents (if you are 21 or older) and your spouse. You can also sponsor your married children and, if you are 21 or older, your siblings.

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